Certified organic plants, vegetables, herbs, and cut flowers


farming practices

We endeavor to be good stewards of the land through sustainable and organic practices.  To be sustainable, we consider the ecological, agricultural, economic, domestic, and neighborly implications of our practices.  We recognize and accept the limits brought on by these implications.  Valuing the land as a gift, we are committed to using it with care, conserving the soil life and other creatures that make up the living network that sustains us.  In essence, we strive to respect the grace and mystery of life.  


Because of this commitment, we use organic methods and are USDA certified organic.  All of our crops are grown without the use of synthetic pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, or genetically modified organisms.


We use compost, hay mulch, crop rotation, and cover crops to create and maintain healthy soil and plants.  These practices feed the soil with increased organic matter and biological activity, releasing nutrients to the crops that follow.


The size of our farm allows the practice of hand weeding/cultivation.  Since we don't use plastic mulch, we pay close attention to timely weeding and irrigation. 

After transplanting a field, we immediately place row covers over top to limit insect pressure, while creating an ideal environment for plants to thrive.


THE FARMERS

Holly and James Hammond come from farming backgrounds.  Holly grew up in  Arizona on an 80 acre u-pick vegetable farm, and James in North Carolina to a long line of tobacco farmers.


Holly and James met in Arizona, while Holly attended Arizona State University and James trained as a professional baseball player.  They started a community garden in their neighborhood, where they spent many hot afternoons working. 


After spending several years in catering and computer sales, they left their jobs to pursue their dream of farming on a small scale.  Before starting Whisper Hill, Holly and James worked on a small dairy, thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail, and spent a season working at Waterpenny Farm in Sperryville, Virginia.